Comparison of the Four-step Basic Life Support Approach with Non-Standardised Training Approach in Achieving Basic Life Support Proficiency among the Healthcare Workers

Authors

  • Fuad Ahmad Siddiqi Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Pakistan
  • Wasif Anwar Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Pakistan
  • Bilal Saeed Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Pakistan
  • Maryam Hussain Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Pakistan
  • Naveed Abbas Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Pakistan
  • Junaid Sarfraz Khan Department of Medicine, Lady Reading Hospital, Peshawar/Medical Teaching Institution, Peshawar Pakistan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51253/pafmj.v73i6.10375

Keywords:

BLS, non-standardised training, Checklist, Four-step BLS training

Abstract

Objective: To quantify the effectiveness of non-structured training versus a structured 4-step approach for basic life support (BLS) knowledge and skills using quantitative assessment tools.

Study Design: Quasi-experimental study.

Place and Duration of Study: Department of Medicine, Combined Military Hospital, Peshawar Pakistan from Oct 2022 to Mar 2023.

Methodology: Two hundred (n=200) healthcare workers from all Hospital Departments were included in the study through
convenient sampling. They were divided into “Group-A” and “Group-B” of equal size. Group-A received BLS training
through a four-step approach, whereas Group-B received non-structured teacher-based training. Pre and post-training MCQs judged the knowledge gained, and a checklist was used to assess the effectiveness of the BLS skills.

Results: Both the groups had similar scores in the Pre-training test (p 0.692). Both groups improved their scores after their
respective training (p<0.001 for both groups). However, Group-A got a better score (mean score =70.50±11.22) than Group- B (mean score =59.60±11.88) with a highly significant difference (p-value<0.001). There was also a significant improvement (p<0.001) in BLS skills performance as per the checklist in Group-A (mean 7.69±1.47) versus Group-B (mean 6.18±1.34) out of a maximum score of 10.

Conclusion: The 4-step program is significantly better than non-standardised training in achieving BLS learning outcomes.

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Published

28-12-2023

How to Cite

Siddiqi, F. A., Anwar, W., Saeed, B., Hussain, M., Abbas, N., & Khan, J. S. (2023). Comparison of the Four-step Basic Life Support Approach with Non-Standardised Training Approach in Achieving Basic Life Support Proficiency among the Healthcare Workers. Pakistan Armed Forces Medical Journal, 73(6), 1826–1829. https://doi.org/10.51253/pafmj.v73i6.10375

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