ASSOCIATION OF RISK FACTORS IN MILITARY PERSONNEL WITH PULMONARY EMBOLISM STATIONED AT HIGH ALTITUDE AND SEA LEVEL

  • Rizwan Azam Pak Emirates Military Hospital/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Rawalpindi Pakistan
  • Laima Alam Pak Emirates Military Hospital/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Rawalpindi Pakistan
  • Jamal Ahmed Pak Emirates Military Hospital/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Rawalpindi Pakistan
  • Mehmood Iqbal Malik Pak Emirates Military Hospital/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Rawalpindi Pakistan
  • Zahra Asif Sukhera Pak Emirates Military Hospital/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Rawalpindi Pakistan
  • Bushra Arif Pak Emirates Military Hospital/National University of Medical Sciences (NUMS) Rawalpindi Pakistan
Keywords: High altitude, Hypercoagulability, Hypoxia, Pulmonary embolism, Soldiers, Thrombophilia

Abstract

Objective: To compare the risk factors of pulmonary embolism between military personnel living at sea level and high altitude.

Study Design: Prospective cross sectional.

Place and Duration of Study: Pak Emirates Military Hospital (PEMH) and Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Rawalpindi, from Oct 2018 to Mar 2019.

Methodology: A total of 52 young soldiers presenting with pulmonary embolism were segregated into two equal groups according to the altitude. A thorough history and clinical examination was followed by a battery of biochemical, immunological and radiological tests for confirming diagnosis, establishing complications and ruling out possible cause(s) of pulmonary embolism.

Results: Soldiers with pulmonary embolism evacuated from high altitude had a lower body mass index (BMI) (23.5 ± 0.4) and were relatively younger (33.3 ± 1.6 years). The most common presenting symptom was dyspnoea (94.2%) followed by pleuritic chest pain (77%). Majority (92.3%) of the subjects from high altitude had no risk factors for vascular thrombosis in comparison to low landers (77%). Smoking and a relatively high platelet count were the only findings in the soldiers posted at high altitude.

Conclusion: In conclusion, high altitude is an uncommon but known cause of pulmonary embolism in army personnel residing at high altitudes. No risk factor other than smoking and a relatively higher platelet count was found in these patients.

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Published
2020-08-20
How to Cite
Azam, R., Alam, L., Ahmed, J., Malik, M., Sukhera, Z., & Arif, B. (2020). ASSOCIATION OF RISK FACTORS IN MILITARY PERSONNEL WITH PULMONARY EMBOLISM STATIONED AT HIGH ALTITUDE AND SEA LEVEL. PAFMJ, 70(4), 1061-65. Retrieved from https://pafmj.org/index.php/PAFMJ/article/view/5092
Section
Original Articles

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