TABOOS AND MYTHS REGARDING BREASTFEEDING PRACTICES IN PREGNANT POPULATION

Breastfeeding Practices

  • Faiza Ibrar Fauji foundation hospital
  • Naila Khursheed Foundation University, Islamabad Campus
  • Saima Qamar CMH Lahore Medical College https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1935-1930
  • Atikka Masud
  • Bushra Ifthikhar
  • Seema Gul
Keywords: Breast feeding, Myths, Taboos, Exclusive breast feeding, Pregnancy

Abstract

Objective: To determine the taboos and myths regarding breastfeeding practices in our pregnant population.

Study Design: Cross-sectional study.

Place and Duration of Study: Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi Pakistan, from May to Oct 2018.

Methodology: A total of 100 pregnant women attending antenatal clinics were included in the study using non-probability purposive sampling technique. Taboos and myths regarding breast feeding practices were determined using self-administered questionnaire on 2-point Likert scale (1=agree & 2=disagree).

Results: A total of 100 pregnant women participated in the study. Mean parity was 2.89 ± 1.75 and gravidity was 4.17 ± 2.04. Most of the mothers (90%) were house wives and received information regarding breast feeding from family members (81%). Mothers were aware of the nutritious value of breast milk as compared to formula milk. However, there were myths that were not evidence based. These include: breasts sag with breast feeding (48%), it is not necessary to breast feed the baby during night time (43%), breast milk alone was not sufficient to satisfy the child (51%), small size breast produce insufficient milk (27%).

Conclusion: Participants of this study are aware of the importance of breast feeding. However, there are certain taboos and myths prevailing in our population which are not proven scientifically.

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Published
2021-10-31
How to Cite
Ibrar, F., Khursheed, N., Qamar, S., Masud, A., Ifthikhar, B., & Gul, S. (2021). TABOOS AND MYTHS REGARDING BREASTFEEDING PRACTICES IN PREGNANT POPULATION. PAFMJ, 71(5), 1647-50. https://doi.org/10.51253/pafmj.v71i5.4765
Section
Original Articles

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